The most powerful video for fans of train sound

train-track friction sound

the wheels across the rail


Rail squeal is a screeching train-track friction sound, commonly occurring on sharp curves. The noise can be annoying to nearby residents. Squeal is presumably caused by the lateral sticking and slipping of the wheels across the rail head.

 This results in vibrations in the wheel that increase until a stable amplitude is reached. Lubricating the rails has limited success. Speed reduction also appears to reduce noise levels
 
The mechanism that causes the squealing also is the cause of wear and tear that is happening to both rails and wheels.
 Train noise is vehicle noise created by trains.
 Noises may be heard inside the train and outside. Various parts of a train produce noise, and different kinds of train wheels produce different amounts of noise. Noise barriers can attenuate the noise.

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Crazy review of the Motorcycle Festival

Motorcycle Rally

 
The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is a motorcycle rally held annually in Sturgis, South Dakota, for ten days.
 In 2015 the city of Sturgis officially expanded the dates to have the rally start on the Friday before the first full week of August and end on the second Sunday. 
 

 
 

bad joint railroad tracks


Why do trains make so much noise


Train noise can be a type of environmental noise. When a train is moving, there are several distinct sounds such as the locomotive engine noise and the wheels turning on the railroad track. 
The air displacement of a train or subway car in a tunnel can create different whooshing sounds.
 Trains also employ horns, whistles, bells, and other noisemaking devices for both communication and warning. Trains propelled by electric traction motors often produce electromagnetically-excited noise.



 This high pitch noise depends on the speed and torque level of the machine, as well as on the motor type. Variable frequency drives use Pulse-width modulation technique which introduces additional current harmonics, resulting in higher acoustic noise.

 The switching frequency of the PWM can be asynchronous (independent of the speed), synchronous (proportional to the speed), but always results in acoustic noise varying with speed. Flange Squeal is the sound of the flanges of the metal train wheelset turning on the train track.

Fastest commercial electric train in the world

 world fastest commercial passenger maglev


fastest electric train in the world
 fastest commercial passenger maglev in operation at 430 km/h Shanghai Maglev: 267 mph
 Fuxing Hao CR400AF/BF: 249 mph
 Shinkansen H5 and E5: 224 mph
 The Italo and Frecciarossa: 220 mph 
Renfe AVE: 217 mph 
Haramain Western Railway: 217 mph.
 DeutscheBahn ICE: 205 mph
 Korail KTX: 205 mph.

 The magnetic-levitation train ride from the international airport to the city is the perfect metaphor for Shanghai. The train reaches speeds of 430 km/hr (267 miles/hr), and the trip takes less than eight minutes. 



 The Shanghai maglev train or Shanghai Transrapid is a magnetic levitation train line that operates in Shanghai. The line is the third commercially operated maglev line in history, the oldest commercial maglev still in operation, and the first commercial high-speed maglev with cruising speed of 431 km/h

 

Japanese fastest train new generation

 The ALFA-X train japan


The ALFA-X will arrive at the world's quickest business speed for a wheeled slug train 
 
 A model of Japan's cutting edge Shinkansen slug train, set to be the quickest train on wheels when it enters administration, arrived at velocities of 320 kilometers (198 miles) every hour on a trial Thursday. The train, code-named ALFA-X, will in the long run hit 360 kilometers for each hour when it starts to take travelers in about 10 years, as indicated by East Japan Railway.
 

 
 Creation of the 10-vehicle train with a long nose-formed head completed toward the beginning of May at an expense of 10 billion yen ($91 million). 
 
 Thursday's preliminary attempt among Sendai and Morioka, two urban communities in northern Japan, was the principal open to the media since tests began a week ago. 
 
 Japan is a pioneer in rapid rail organizations, hailed for their timeliness and security measures, including the crisis stop framework, which can naturally hinder speeds before a significant quake strikes.

Speed, power and luxury on Chinese trains

High-speed rail in China

High-speed rail in China is the world's longest high speed railway network and most extensively used.
 The HSR network encompasses newly built rail lines with a design speed of 200–350 km/h. China's HSR accounts for two-thirds of the world's total high-speed railway networks. By 2019, 
China keeps the world's largest high speed rail (HSR) network with a length totaling over 35,000 km (21,750 mi).
 The world's longest HSR line, Beijing - Hong Kong High Speed Railway, extends 2,440 km (1,516 mi). China high speed trains, also known as bullet or fast trains, can reach a top speed of 350 km/h (217 mph).



 Over 2,800 pairs of bullet trains numbered by G, D or C run daily connecting over 550 cities in China and covering 33 of the country's 34 provinces. Beijing-Shanghai high speed train link the two megacities 1,318 km (819 mi) away in just 4.5 hours.
 

Japan’s most famous Bullet train

Japanese fast shinkansen

 

The Hokkaido Shinkansen is a Japanese fast shinkansen rail line that connections up with the Tōhoku Shinkansen in northern Aomori Prefecture in Honshu and proceeds into the inside of Hokkaido through the undersea Seikan Tunnel.


 

 One of Japan's most celebrated images is the Shinkansen shot train, a mind blowing bit of building and innovation intended to interface the funding to Japan's significant urban communities, with movement seasons of just a couple of hours. 

 Nonetheless, one significant city, Sapporo (Japan's fifth-biggest at 1.8 million), was never easily open from Tokyo by rail. Excursions to Hokkaido once implied an entire day train ride or a short-term resting vehicle. 

 

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